Archive for the ‘Communications’ Category

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Video Blog : Distractions Kill Teams

January 2, 2015

To see video click – www.screencast.com/t/b9lFNBIt

Also visit:

Websites:   www.ProjectPragmatics.com  and

http://www.JohncMaxwellGroup.com/bobmaksimchuk

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The Baker’s Dozen of Coaching Leadership

May 11, 2014

1. Be Dedicated – to your client, your team, yourself. Commitment builds trust.
2. Be Curious – about your profession, your client, other fields. Learn continuously. If you think you know it all, you have limited your potential.
3. Be Humble – no matter how successful, smart, or well-known. Arrogance destroys relationships.
4. Be Energetic – Do you bring energy into the room or do you drain the life out of it?
5. Be Engaged – Your client doesn’t value an aloof advisor who provides little value.
6. Be Perceptive – See their gifts. Does your team have cheerleaders (encouragers), pragmatists (guides), jokers (morale builders), dreamers (visionaries)? Leverage these soft abilities as much as hard skills.
7. Be Empathic – See their needs. Be sure to serve their actual needs, not yours.
8. Be Resourceful – When your team has no answer and neither do you, take the initiative to go find a new option or approach for them that may be useful.
9. Be Uplifting – Don’t criticize the doubtful, the non-believers. Encourage and uplift them.
10. Be Persistent – when you hear “we’ve always done it this way”. You are a change agent. You can’t sail the seas when you are tied to the dock.
11. Be Resolute – Reject rejection. Take the high road. Repay your critics with kindness, service, and understanding.
12. Be Fun – Celebrate with your teams whenever they succeed, big or small.
13. Be Caring – Remember, they are not assets or resources. They are real people. With real lives. Just like you.

Come visit http://www.projectpragmatics.com .

 

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What Are You Sprinting Toward?

May 7, 2013

They knew all eyes would be watching them. They knew huge crowds would be in attendance. And they knew some of those attending were there to cause trouble. Facing this, the Tampa police had an interesting objective for the week of the Republican National Convention. You might expect an objective like “Keep the peace.” Or “Do what it takes to control the crowds.” Or some other stereotypical statement. But no. Their stated objective was that they did not want to see the police on the nightly news.

Quite an unusual objective than would be expected. It did restrict the police in some ways, but still allowed them to carry out their mission while keeping the department’s overall objective in mind. The results: The convention was peaceful, protesters had their say without violent crowds rampaging in the streets, and you didn’t see the police cast in a bad light on the nightly news, if you saw them at all.

Do your sprints have meaningful objectives? Or do you think that is not important?

Objectives keep the team focused on what is important; what you want to achieve overall vs. just delivering the stories in the sprint. They also help eliminate the unwanted results (e.g. seeing film of police in riot gear hosing down the crowds with water cannons).

Unfortunately, instead of thinking through a good objective for their sprints, many teams just work bottom up. They pick their sprint stories and just use a summary of those as the sprint objective(s). This approach is not effective. It boils down to “Do your job” as an objective. It provides no guidance at all as to “how” or with what considerations the work is to be done. For example, the police could have showed up in full riot gear, with water cannons in visible locations, lined up in high numbers around the protestors, with paddy wagons at the ready. But that would likely have guaranteed high visibility news footage, and not in a good light.

There is also a psychological side to having objectives. To reframe a well-known motivational story, what is more satisfying: “I laid ten rows of brick today” or “I finished a cathedral today”? Just finishing your task list for today is good but it rarely gets you energized for tomorrow. But finishing a customer objective (i.e. the cathedral)…now that is something else.

If you are doing sprints or releases without having meaningful objective(s) you are depriving yourself of a simple technique to keep the team focused on the outcome desired and cheating your team out of well-earned celebration of their achievements.

(Read More at https://www.ProjectPragmatics.com)

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Agile Heresy

January 2, 2012

 Those who do the work are the best people to estimate what it takes to perform the work.  Makes sense.  Sounds reasonable.  The problem with such a definitive statement is the subjective word “best”.  Most of us read “best qualified” into that statement.  But what if the “best” person to do the estimation, won’t?  Have you ever worked with people on an agile team who don’t want to contribute to the backlog item estimation activity?  Sometimes a rigid corporate culture causes people who are, or perceive themselves to be “lower on the food chain” to say little and thereby avoid perceived conflict or anger of a more senior person.  Sometimes it’s a cultural behavior.  Sometimes fear.  Sometimes shyness.

 One successful team that I coached found a workable solution.  They selected a small sub-team from the more senior people on the team.  This sub-team did the estimation for the whole team.  It worked well and they have been very successful.

 But do you think this is agile heresy?  If so, how would you otherwise fix such a situation?

 Paraphrasing that old adage: You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him estimate.

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Perfect Questions?

November 29, 2010

During a recent discussion I was having with a colleague who is an Agile Coach and Business Analyst, I asked her what the BA community was interested in regarding the practice of business analysis. Her answer surprised me. She said what many BAs want is the perfect list of questions to ask their clients. The perfect list of questions? Really? Who has that? For all situations?

Instead of the perfect list, how about a relevant list? How could that be created? What if you had a guide that could help you see what to ask? You do. Read More…

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The Leadership and Communication Lessons of Josey Wales – Part 4

October 7, 2010

In the last installment, we left Josey and his rebel friend at a river crossing. There they met the boatman Sim Carstairs, Granny Hawkins, who runs a supply store, and a carpetbagger. We discussed the loquacious Sim and now let’s see what we can learn from the unforgettable Granny Hawkins.   This grizzled, toothless, wise old woman can teach us numerous lessons.  Read More…

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The Leadership and Communication Lessons of Josey Wales – Part 3

August 27, 2010

The scene: Josey and his injured young rebel friend furtively approach a river crossing. There they meet three very interesting people – the boatman, Sim Carstairs, who ferries people across the river, Granny Hawkins, who provides supplies and “poultices” to travelers, and a fastidious carpetbagger, wearing a white suit, selling bottles of a cure-all elixir. It is these new characters, not Josey, that teach us a few interesting leadership and communication lessons. Read more…