Posts Tagged ‘model’

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Perfect Questions?

November 29, 2010

During a recent discussion I was having with a colleague who is an Agile Coach and Business Analyst, I asked her what the BA community was interested in regarding the practice of business analysis. Her answer surprised me. She said what many BAs want is the perfect list of questions to ask their clients. The perfect list of questions? Really? Who has that? For all situations?

Instead of the perfect list, how about a relevant list? How could that be created? What if you had a guide that could help you see what to ask? You do. Read More…

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Simplify the UML?

November 18, 2010

I am continually amazed at the serendipity of events that occurs everyday. A short time ago I was having lunch with an industry insider when he mentioned the beginnings of a movement to simplify the UML. Having read the 700+ page UML specification a number of times (Sadistic, isn’t it?) it immediately struck me as a good idea. While software modeling is an “acknowledged” technique, it still is not a “standard” practice on most software projects. From the common, repeating questions that I have been asked over the years, many people still struggle with how to do it well. Modeling has a way to go to become truly mainstream. So a simpler UML sounded like a fine idea. But…Read More.

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Don’t Rewrite the UML

May 25, 2010

In software development there are best practices there are also worst practices. When bad practices become a common pattern of behavior they can attain “anti-pattern” status. In this article, I’d like to introduce you to the “I Did It My Way” © anti-pattern. Read about it at DevX.com. If you are interested in additional articles, you can find more at http://www.projectpragmatics.com/.

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The Goldilocks Conundrum

May 13, 2010

Use cases are by far the most commonly used element of the UML. This is also the area where modelers have the most difficulties. Use cases appear to be so simple and easy to use. Remember, as Jim Horning said “Nothing is as simple as we hope it will be.” … Just as Goldilocks could not find suitable sleeping arrangements, modelers often have problems with the abstraction level of a use case. In other words, is it too big? Too small? Read more on the DevX feature series Useful UML Modeling.