Posts Tagged ‘“use case”’

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Perfect Questions?

November 29, 2010

During a recent discussion I was having with a colleague who is an Agile Coach and Business Analyst, I asked her what the BA community was interested in regarding the practice of business analysis. Her answer surprised me. She said what many BAs want is the perfect list of questions to ask their clients. The perfect list of questions? Really? Who has that? For all situations?

Instead of the perfect list, how about a relevant list? How could that be created? What if you had a guide that could help you see what to ask? You do. Read More…

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What Would You Like To See…For Free?

August 17, 2010

We are beginning a project to develop freely available online content. But first, we need your opinion on what topics this content should cover. Please take a moment to answer these five quick questions so that we can provide you the information that you need. Click here to go to the survey. Thanks for your input.

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The UML’s Double-Edged Sword

July 9, 2010

The sword is one of the most ubiquitous crafted weapons across civilizations worldwide. They come in many different shapes, sizes, and materials. An attribute that they all have in common is a sharp edge. Some multiply their offensive capability by being sharpened on both edges, i.e., the double-edged sword. These are more deadly because they can “cut both ways”. Who would have expected that the innocent use case would introduce a double-edged sword into the UML? Read more at DevX.com…

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The UML Survey Results Are In

June 15, 2010

In April, I invited one and all to participate in a simple survey to see how they are actually using the UML on projects. Is it really mainstreamed? Is it still in the adoption phase? Or is it in decline? The survey is now closed. Thanks to those who participated. Here are the results. Read more…

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The Goldilocks Conundrum

May 13, 2010

Use cases are by far the most commonly used element of the UML. This is also the area where modelers have the most difficulties. Use cases appear to be so simple and easy to use. Remember, as Jim Horning said “Nothing is as simple as we hope it will be.” … Just as Goldilocks could not find suitable sleeping arrangements, modelers often have problems with the abstraction level of a use case. In other words, is it too big? Too small? Read more on the DevX feature series Useful UML Modeling.

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Fun With Frames and the User Experience Model

April 12, 2010

Development teams don’t necessarily receive “requirements” from their stakeholders as use cases, textual requirements, user stories, or even “drive-by requirements” (where the stakeholder throws a yellow sticky note – that contains their latest requirement – over your cubicle wall as they walk down the hallway). And sometimes the end users (an important stakeholder) are so focused around the user interface of the system, that suggesting changes to their user interface is the only way they know how to express their needs.

The advice you commonly hear regarding using the UML© for user interface modeling ranges from “don’t do it” to (at best) “create a User Experience (UX) model”. The UX model as traditionally described is good for simple situations, but with the advent of more modern, complex UI presentation options, the traditional UX model’s utility begins to reach its limit quickly.

I was pleased to find an elegant answer available in a little used area of the UML© that does not get delved into deeply very often…Read more